Natural Philosophy Collection

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  ABDNP201198a02.JPG - Oxford Instruments: Superconducting Magnet Oxford Instruments is now a global instrument firm.  It was founded as a spin-off from Oxford University's Physics Department at the Clarendon Laboratory by Martin and Audrey Wood in 1959 for the purpose of commercialising superconducting magnets.  Our magnet is quite an early product of Oxford Instruments, manufactured in 1965 for a research project in the Department of Natural Philosophy at Aberdeen.  In the event, it was never used. This superconducting magnet is made from expensive niobium alloy that is superconducting only below a temperature of about 10 K.  In operation it is cooled by liquid helium and once the circulating current is established at low temperature it will generate a strong magnetic field indefinitely.  Should the superconductivity be lost (for example by a rise in temperature) the substantial energy of the field is dumped into the power supply, which has to be specially designed to cope.  The accompanying power supply is not on display. ABDNP:201198a  
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11 | Oxford Instruments: Superconducting Magnet

Oxford Instruments is now a global instrument firm. It was founded as a spin-off from Oxford University's Physics Department at the Clarendon Laboratory by Martin and Audrey Wood in 1959 for the purpose of commercialising superconducting magnets. Our magnet is quite an early product of Oxford Instruments, manufactured in 1965 for a research project in the Department of Natural Philosophy at Aberdeen. In the event, it was never used.

This superconducting magnet is made from expensive niobium alloy that is superconducting only below a temperature of about 10 K. In operation it is cooled by liquid helium and once the circulating current is established at low temperature it will generate a strong magnetic field indefinitely. Should the superconductivity be lost (for example by a rise in temperature) the substantial energy of the field is dumped into the power supply, which has to be specially designed to cope. The accompanying power supply is not on display.

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