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  ABDNP201516a03.JPG - Watkins & Hill Marcet's Steam Apparatus It's hard to believe from its almost new appearance that this piece was made in the 1820s and has survived the rigours of rattling around in drawers or a cupboard for well over a century and a half.  Probably few people knew what it was for. Marcet's steam apparatus was invented by François Marcet, son of the famous popularising author Jane Marcet.  Into the pressure vessel are screwed a mercury manometer and a thermometer.  The vessel is partly filled with water and heated.  By combining the corresponding pressure and temperature readings as more and more heat is added, one obtains the graph of steam vapour pressure at superheated temperatures.  This was important information for the design of steam engines that were going beyond Watt's low pressure versions and exploring the region of high pressure, high temperature steam where greater efficiencies could be had. Professor Knight, Patrick Copland's successor, records in the 1824/25 accounts that he purchased Marcet's Steam Apparatus ABDNP:201516a  
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6 | Watkins & Hill Marcet's Steam Apparatus

It's hard to believe from its almost new appearance that this piece was made in the 1820s and has survived the rigours of rattling around in drawers or a cupboard for well over a century and a half. Probably few people knew what it was for.

Marcet's steam apparatus was invented by François Marcet, son of the famous popularising author Jane Marcet. Into the pressure vessel are screwed a mercury manometer and a thermometer. The vessel is partly filled with water and heated. By combining the corresponding pressure and temperature readings as more and more heat is added, one obtains the graph of steam vapour pressure at superheated temperatures. This was important information for the design of steam engines that were going beyond Watt's low pressure versions and exploring the region of high pressure, high temperature steam where greater efficiencies could be had.

Professor Knight, Patrick Copland's successor, records in the 1824/25 accounts that he purchased Marcet's Steam Apparatus

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