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  ABDNP200048a01.JPG - Breguet Railway Telegraph Receiver Although telegraphy is usually associated with Morse code, Charles Wheatstone's needle telegraphs and his ABC telegraph were popular in early years.  No Morse code was involved in any of these systems.  Breguet's telegraph is an 'ABC telegraph' requiring very little operator training that became popular with the railways.  The Caledonian Railway that ran North of Aberdeen was said to be the first railway in the country that had telegraphic communication installed as it was built, in the 1850s.  The existence of a Breguet sender and receiver in our collection suggests that they might well have used this system. The Breguet receiver is modified clock technology.  This is not surprising since Breguet made his name as a clockmaker before branching out into telegraphic equipment.  The dial is linked through gears to a spring and escapement.  The spring provides the motive power for the dial to move through the alphabet, the escapement prevents it doing so unless activated by an electrical pulse from the sender.  Such a pulse releases the pointer to move one step, namely one letter.  At the end of each word the dial is returned to the top position. The sender, not shown here, is simply a manually operated dial with a handle that can be moved around the alphabet, sending electrical pulses as it moves from one letter to the next.  In communication terms, the system is inefficient (sometimes the next letter can take over 20 pulses) and error intolerant but it is simple to operate. ABDNP:200048a  
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11 | Breguet Railway Telegraph Receiver

Although telegraphy is usually associated with Morse code, Charles Wheatstone's needle telegraphs and his ABC telegraph were popular in early years. No Morse code was involved in any of these systems. Breguet's telegraph is an 'ABC telegraph' requiring very little operator training that became popular with the railways. The Caledonian Railway that ran North of Aberdeen was said to be the first railway in the country that had telegraphic communication installed as it was built, in the 1850s. The existence of a Breguet sender and receiver in our collection suggests that they might well have used this system.

The Breguet receiver is modified clock technology. This is not surprising since Breguet made his name as a clockmaker before branching out into telegraphic equipment. The dial is linked through gears to a spring and escapement. The spring provides the motive power for the dial to move through the alphabet, the escapement prevents it doing so unless activated by an electrical pulse from the sender. Such a pulse releases the pointer to move one step, namely one letter. At the end of each word the dial is returned to the top position.

The sender, not shown here, is simply a manually operated dial with a handle that can be moved around the alphabet, sending electrical pulses as it moves from one letter to the next. In communication terms, the system is inefficient (sometimes the next letter can take over 20 pulses) and error intolerant but it is simple to operate.

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