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  ABDNP2000247a01.JPG - Watkins & Hill: Torroidal Tube You will not be the first person to look at this simple tube on a stand and wonder what it was made for. The piece is a forgotten demonstration by Charles Wheatstone.  Wheatstone is known for his innovative electrical work, particularly his work pioneering electric telegraphic apparatus, but his early business was as a music instrument seller, during which occupation he designed the Wheatstone concertina, still quite widely played today.  Our demonstration piece is intended to show that open and closed tubes resonate at different frequencies, the closed tube at about half the frequency of the open tube. With the torroid in its closed position, the resonance is excited by bowing a plate that vibrates at the right frequency slotted into the gap.  When the top half of the tube is swung away, converting it into an S shaped open tube, no resonance is now heard.  The open tube resonance can be excited by a plate bowed to vibrate at twice the previous frequency. Professor David Thomson of King's College was enthusiastic about the subject of acoustics and later in his career contributed the article on Acoustics to the famous 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica.  It is likely he purchased this demonstration piece after his appointment in 1845 while Watkins & Hill were still in business. ABDNP:200247a  
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7 | Watkins & Hill: Torroidal Tube

You will not be the first person to look at this simple tube on a stand and wonder what it was made for.

The piece is a forgotten demonstration by Charles Wheatstone. Wheatstone is known for his innovative electrical work, particularly his work pioneering electric telegraphic apparatus, but his early business was as a music instrument seller, during which occupation he designed the Wheatstone concertina, still quite widely played today. Our demonstration piece is intended to show that open and closed tubes resonate at different frequencies, the closed tube at about half the frequency of the open tube.

With the torroid in its closed position, the resonance is excited by bowing a plate that vibrates at the right frequency slotted into the gap. When the top half of the tube is swung away, converting it into an S shaped open tube, no resonance is now heard. The open tube resonance can be excited by a plate bowed to vibrate at twice the previous frequency.

Professor David Thomson of King's College was enthusiastic about the subject of acoustics and later in his career contributed the article on Acoustics to the famous 9th edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica. It is likely he purchased this demonstration piece after his appointment in 1845 while Watkins & Hill were still in business.

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